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    This harmonized set of soil parameter estimates for the Upper Tana river catchment, Kenya. The data set was derived from the 1:250 000 scale Soil and Terrain Database for the Upper Tana (SOTER_UT, ver. 1.1; Dijkshoorn et al. 2011) and the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database, using standardized taxonomy-based pedotransfer (taxotransfer) procedures. The land surface of the Upper Tana, Kenya, covering some 18,900 km2, has been mapped in SOTER using 191 unique SOTER units. Each map unit may comprise of up to three different soil components. In so far as possible, each soil component has been characterized by a regionally representative profile, selected and classified by national soil experts. Conversely, in the absence of any measured legacy data, soil components were characterized using synthetic profiles for which only the FAO-Unesco (1988) classification is known. Soil components in SOTER_UT have been characterized using 146 profiles consisting of 109 real and 37 so-called synthetic profiles. The latter were used to represent some 18% per cent of the study area. Comprehensive sets of measured attribute data are seldom available for most profiles (109) collated in SOTER_UT, as these were not considered in the source materials. Consequently, to permit modelling, gaps in the soil analytical data have been filled using consistent taxotransfer procedures. Modal soil property estimates necessary to populate the taxotransfer procedure were derived from statistical analyses of soil profiles held in the ISRIC-WISE database. The current taxotransfer procedure only considers profiles in WISE that: (a) have FAO soil unit names (43) identical to those mapped for the Upper Tana in SOTER, and (b) originate from regions having similar Köppen climate zones (n= 5745). Property estimates are presented for 18 soil variables by soil unit for fixed depth intervals of 0.2 m to 1 m depth: organic carbon, total nitrogen, pH(H2O), CECsoil, CECclay, base saturation, effective CEC, aluminium saturation, CaCO3 content, gypsum content, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), electrical conductivity (ECe), bulk density, content of sand, silt and clay, content of coarse fragments (less than 2 mm), and volumetric water content (-33 kPa to -1.5 MPa). These attributes have been identified as being useful for agro-ecological zoning, land evaluation, crop growth simulation, modelling of soil carbon stocks and change, and studies of global environmental change. The soil property estimates can be linked to the spatial data (map), using GIS, through the unique SOTER-unit code; database applications should consider the full map unit composition and depth range.

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    Sand content (50-2000 micro meter) mass fraction in % at 7 standard depths predicted using the global compilation of soil ground observations. Accuracy assessement of the maps is availble in Hengl et at. (2017) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0169748. Data provided as GeoTIFFs with internal compression (co='COMPRESS=DEFLATE'). Measurement units: w%. To visualize these layers or request a support please use www.soilgrids.org.

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    The organic carbon content (in mass-%) map for the 0-10-cm soil layer of the United Republic of Tanzania was generated by means of digital soil mapping in a regression-kriging framework (‘Simple kriging with varying local means’) implemented in the Open Source Software R. Over 3,000 soil point observations were used to generate the map. Data sources were NAFORMA, Tanzania National Soil Survey, African Soil Profiles Database Version 1.1, and AfSIS. In addition a suite of environmental GIS data layers were used such as a land cover map, SOTER soil class map, maps of topographic attributes derived from the SRTM-DEM, maps of surface reflectance and vegetation indices derived from satellite imagery. The point observations were correlated to the environmental data layers using a linear regression model. This model was used to predict the carbon content at the nodes of a regular grid with 250 meter cell size. The regression residuals were kriged to the prediction grid nodes and added to the regression prediction to obtain the final prediction of carbon content. Map projection is UTM Zone 36S.The root mean square error, as determined through 10-fold cross-validation, is 0.89%. The map was produced by ISRIC - World Soil Information in a collaborative effort with the National Soil Survey, Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism, Tanzania Forest Services, Sokoine University, and AfSIS.

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    Bulk density of the whole soil including coarse fragments, air dried (kg/dm³). ISRIC is developing a centralized and user–focused server database, known as ISRIC World Soil Information Service (WoSIS). The aims are to: • Safeguard world soil data "as is" • Share soil data (point, polygon, grid) upon their standardization and harmonization • Provide quality-assessed input for a growing range of environmental applications. So far some 400,000 profiles have been imported into WoSIS from disparate soil databases; some 150,000 of have been standardised. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Further, in most source data sets, there are fewer data for soil physical as opposed to soil chemical attributes and there are fewer measurements for deeper than for superficial horizons. Generally, limited quality information is associated with the various source data. Special attention has been paid to the standardization of soil analytical method descriptions with focus on the set of soil properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications. Newly developed procedures for the above, that consider the soil property, analytical method and unit of measurement, have been applied to the present set of geo-referenced soil profile data. Gradually, the quality assessed and harmonized "shared" data will be made available to the international community through several webservices. All data managed in WoSIS are handled in conformance with ISRICs data use and citation policy, respecting inherited restrictions. The most recent set of standardized attributes derived from WoSIS are available via WFS. For instructions see Procedures manual 2018, Appendix A, link below (Procedures manual 2018)

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    Predicted probability in percent per class predicted using the global compilation of soil ground observations. Accuracy assessement of the maps is availble in Hengl et at. (2017) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0169748. Data provided as GeoTIFFs with internal compression (co='COMPRESS=DEFLATE'). Measurement units: probability. To visualize these layers or request a support please use www.soilgrids.org.

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    Measured according to the Mehlich-3 extractant, a combination of acids (acetic [HOAc] and nitric [HNO3]), salts (ammonium fluoride [NH4F] and ammonium nitrate [NH4 NO3]), and the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); considered suitable for removing P and other elements in acid and neutral soils (mg/kg). ISRIC is developing a centralized and user–focused server database, known as ISRIC World Soil Information Service (WoSIS). The aims are to: • Safeguard world soil data "as is" • Share soil data (point, polygon, grid) upon their standardization and harmonization • Provide quality-assessed input for a growing range of environmental applications. So far some 400,000 profiles have been imported into WoSIS from disparate soil databases; some 150,000 of have been standardised. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Further, in most source data sets, there are fewer data for soil physical as opposed to soil chemical attributes and there are fewer measurements for deeper than for superficial horizons. Generally, limited quality information is associated with the various source data. Special attention has been paid to the standardization of soil analytical method descriptions with focus on the set of soil properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications. Newly developed procedures for the above, that consider the soil property, analytical method and unit of measurement, have been applied to the present set of geo-referenced soil profile data. Gradually, the quality assessed and harmonized "shared" data will be made available to the international community through several webservices. All data managed in WoSIS are handled in conformance with ISRICs data use and citation policy, respecting inherited restrictions. The most recent set of standardized attributes derived from WoSIS are available via WFS. For instructions see Procedures manual 2018, Appendix A, link below (Procedures manual 2018)

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    Bulk density of the whole soil including coarse fragments, equilibrated at 33 kPa (kg/dm³). ISRIC is developing a centralized and user–focused server database, known as ISRIC World Soil Information Service (WoSIS). The aims are to: • Safeguard world soil data "as is" • Share soil data (point, polygon, grid) upon their standardization and harmonization • Provide quality-assessed input for a growing range of environmental applications. So far some 400,000 profiles have been imported into WoSIS from disparate soil databases; some 150,000 of have been standardised. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Further, in most source data sets, there are fewer data for soil physical as opposed to soil chemical attributes and there are fewer measurements for deeper than for superficial horizons. Generally, limited quality information is associated with the various source data. Special attention has been paid to the standardization of soil analytical method descriptions with focus on the set of soil properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications. Newly developed procedures for the above, that consider the soil property, analytical method and unit of measurement, have been applied to the present set of geo-referenced soil profile data. Gradually, the quality assessed and harmonized "shared" data will be made available to the international community through several webservices. All data managed in WoSIS are handled in conformance with ISRICs data use and citation policy, respecting inherited restrictions. The most recent set of standardized attributes derived from WoSIS are available via WFS. For instructions see Procedures manual 2018, Appendix A, link below (Procedures manual 2018)

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    Bulk density of the fine earth fraction*, oven dry (kg/dm³). ISRIC is developing a centralized and user–focused server database, known as ISRIC World Soil Information Service (WoSIS). The aims are to: • Safeguard world soil data "as is" • Share soil data (point, polygon, grid) upon their standardization and harmonization • Provide quality-assessed input for a growing range of environmental applications. So far some 400,000 profiles have been imported into WoSIS from disparate soil databases; some 150,000 of have been standardised. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Further, in most source data sets, there are fewer data for soil physical as opposed to soil chemical attributes and there are fewer measurements for deeper than for superficial horizons. Generally, limited quality information is associated with the various source data. Special attention has been paid to the standardization of soil analytical method descriptions with focus on the set of soil properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications. Newly developed procedures for the above, that consider the soil property, analytical method and unit of measurement, have been applied to the present set of geo-referenced soil profile data. Gradually, the quality assessed and harmonized "shared" data will be made available to the international community through several webservices. All data managed in WoSIS are handled in conformance with ISRICs data use and citation policy, respecting inherited restrictions. The most recent set of standardized attributes derived from WoSIS are available via WFS. For instructions see Procedures manual 2018, Appendix A, link below (Procedures manual 2018). * The fine earth fraction is generally defined as being less than 2 mm. However, an upper limit of 1 mm was used in the former Soviet Union and its sattelite states (Katchynsky scheme). This has been indicated in the database.

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    Following publication of the World Map of the Satus of Human-induced Land Degradation (GLASOD), at scale 1:10M, the need for more detailed and more country-specific degradation assessment became apparent. In 1993, the members of the Asian Network on Problem Soils recommended the preparation of a qualitative assessment for South and Southeast Asian at a scale of 1:5 million. The assessment was carried out using a physiographic base map, compiled according to the SOTER methodology, and a slightly modified GLASOD methodology. The information was stored in a digital database and linked to a GIS enabling preparation of thematic outputs in the form of maps, graphs and tables.

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    Determined with a very strong acid (aqua regia and sulfuric acid/nitric acid) (mg/kg). ISRIC is developing a centralized and user–focused server database, known as ISRIC World Soil Information Service (WoSIS). The aims are to: • Safeguard world soil data "as is" • Share soil data (point, polygon, grid) upon their standardization and harmonization • Provide quality-assessed input for a growing range of environmental applications. So far some 400,000 profiles have been imported into WoSIS from disparate soil databases; some 150,000 of have been standardised. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Further, in most source data sets, there are fewer data for soil physical as opposed to soil chemical attributes and there are fewer measurements for deeper than for superficial horizons. Generally, limited quality information is associated with the various source data. Special attention has been paid to the standardization of soil analytical method descriptions with focus on the set of soil properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications. Newly developed procedures for the above, that consider the soil property, analytical method and unit of measurement, have been applied to the present set of geo-referenced soil profile data. Gradually, the quality assessed and harmonized "shared" data will be made available to the international community through several webservices. All data managed in WoSIS are handled in conformance with ISRICs data use and citation policy, respecting inherited restrictions. The most recent set of standardized attributes derived from WoSIS are available via WFS. For instructions see Procedures manual 2018, Appendix A, link below (Procedures manual 2018)