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    Larger than Y mm fraction of the fine earth fraction*; Y as specified in the analytical method description (e.g. Y = 0.05 mm to 2 mm*) (g/100g). ISRIC is developing a centralized and user–focused server database, known as ISRIC World Soil Information Service (WoSIS). The aims are to: • Safeguard world soil data "as is" • Share soil data (point, polygon, grid) upon their standardization and harmonization • Provide quality-assessed input for a growing range of environmental applications. So far some 400,000 profiles have been imported into WoSIS from disparate soil databases; some 150,000 of have been standardised. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Further, in most source data sets, there are fewer data for soil physical as opposed to soil chemical attributes and there are fewer measurements for deeper than for superficial horizons. Generally, limited quality information is associated with the various source data. Special attention has been paid to the standardization of soil analytical method descriptions with focus on the set of soil properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications. Newly developed procedures for the above, that consider the soil property, analytical method and unit of measurement, have been applied to the present set of geo-referenced soil profile data. Gradually, the quality assessed and harmonized "shared" data will be made available to the international community through several webservices. All data managed in WoSIS are handled in conformance with ISRICs data use and citation policy, respecting inherited restrictions. The most recent set of standardized attributes derived from WoSIS are available via WFS. For instructions see Procedures manual 2018, Appendix A, link below (Procedures manual 2018). * The fine earth fraction is generally defined as being less than 2 mm. However, an upper limit of 1 mm was used in the former Soviet Union and its sattelite states (Katchynsky scheme). This has been indicated in the database.

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    This harmonized set of soil parameter estimates for Central and Eastern Europe has been derived from a revised version of the 1:2.5M Soil and Terrain (SOTER) Database for Central and Eastern Europe (SOVEUR ver. 1.1) and the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database. The land surface of Central and Eastern Europe, West of the Ural Mountains, has been characterized using 8361 unique maps or SOTER units. The corresponding GIS files include some 9500 mapped polygons, including miscellaneous units. The major soils have been described using 662 profiles, selected by national soil experts as being representative for these units. The associated soil analytical data have been derived from soil survey reports. These sources seldom hold all the physical and chemical attributes ideally required by SOTER. Gaps in the measured soil profile data have been filled using a procedure that uses taxotransfer rules, based on about 9600 soil profiles held in the WISE database, complemented with expert-rules. Parameter estimates are presented by soil unit for fixed depth intervals of 0.2 m to 1 m depth for: organic carbon, total nitrogen, pH(H2O), CECsoil, CECclay, base saturation, effective CEC, aluminium saturation, CaCO3 content, gypsum content, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), electrical conductivity of saturated paste (ECe), bulk density, content of sand, silt and clay, content of coarse fragments (less than 2 mm), and available water capacity (-33 to -1500 kPa). These attributes have been identified as being useful for agro-ecological zoning, land evaluation, crop growth simulation, modelling of soil carbon stocks and change, and analyses of global environmental change. The current parameter estimates should be seen as best estimates based on the current selection of soil profiles and data clustering procedure; taxotransfer rules have been flagged to provide an indication of the confidence in the derived data. Results are presented as summary files and can be linked to the 1:2.5M scale SOVEUR map in a GIS, through the unique SOTER-unit code. The secondary data are considered appropriate for studies at the continental scale (greater than 1:2.5 million); correlation of soil analytical data should be done more rigorously when more detailed scientific work is considered.

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    Ability of a 1:2.5 soil water extract to conduct electrical current (dS/m). ISRIC is developing a centralized and user–focused server database, known as ISRIC World Soil Information Service (WoSIS). The aims are to: • Safeguard world soil data "as is" • Share soil data (point, polygon, grid) upon their standardization and harmonization • Provide quality-assessed input for a growing range of environmental applications. So far some 400,000 profiles have been imported into WoSIS from disparate soil databases; some 150,000 of have been standardised. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Further, in most source data sets, there are fewer data for soil physical as opposed to soil chemical attributes and there are fewer measurements for deeper than for superficial horizons. Generally, limited quality information is associated with the various source data. Special attention has been paid to the standardization of soil analytical method descriptions with focus on the set of soil properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications. Newly developed procedures for the above, that consider the soil property, analytical method and unit of measurement, have been applied to the present set of geo-referenced soil profile data. Gradually, the quality assessed and harmonized "shared" data will be made available to the international community through several webservices. All data managed in WoSIS are handled in conformance with ISRICs data use and citation policy, respecting inherited restrictions. The most recent set of standardized attributes derived from WoSIS are available via WFS. For instructions see Procedures manual 2018, Appendix A, link below (Procedures manual 2018)

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    The content of carbonate in a liming material or calcareous soil calculated as if all of the carbonate is in the form of CaCO3 (in the fine earth fraction*); also known as inorganic carbon (g/kg). ISRIC is developing a centralized and user–focused server database, known as ISRIC World Soil Information Service (WoSIS). The aims are to: • Safeguard world soil data "as is" • Share soil data (point, polygon, grid) upon their standardization and harmonization • Provide quality-assessed input for a growing range of environmental applications. So far some 400,000 profiles have been imported into WoSIS from disparate soil databases; some 150,000 of have been standardised. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Further, in most source data sets, there are fewer data for soil physical as opposed to soil chemical attributes and there are fewer measurements for deeper than for superficial horizons. Generally, limited quality information is associated with the various source data. Special attention has been paid to the standardization of soil analytical method descriptions with focus on the set of soil properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications. Newly developed procedures for the above, that consider the soil property, analytical method and unit of measurement, have been applied to the present set of geo-referenced soil profile data. Gradually, the quality assessed and harmonized "shared" data will be made available to the international community through several webservices. All data managed in WoSIS are handled in conformance with ISRICs data use and citation policy, respecting inherited restrictions. The most recent set of standardized attributes derived from WoSIS are available via WFS. For instructions see Procedures manual 2018, Appendix A, link below (Procedures manual 2018). * The fine earth fraction is generally defined as being less than 2 mm. However, an upper limit of 1 mm was used in the former Soviet Union and its sattelite states (Katchynsky scheme). This has been indicated in the database.

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    The organic carbon content (in mass-%) map for the 0-10-cm soil layer of the United Republic of Tanzania was generated by means of digital soil mapping in a regression-kriging framework (‘Simple kriging with varying local means’) implemented in the Open Source Software R. Over 3,000 soil point observations were used to generate the map. Data sources were NAFORMA, Tanzania National Soil Survey, African Soil Profiles Database Version 1.1, and AfSIS. In addition a suite of environmental GIS data layers were used such as a land cover map, SOTER soil class map, maps of topographic attributes derived from the SRTM-DEM, maps of surface reflectance and vegetation indices derived from satellite imagery. The point observations were correlated to the environmental data layers using a linear regression model. This model was used to predict the carbon content at the nodes of a regular grid with 250 meter cell size. The regression residuals were kriged to the prediction grid nodes and added to the regression prediction to obtain the final prediction of carbon content. Map projection is UTM Zone 36S.The root mean square error, as determined through 10-fold cross-validation, is 0.89%. The map was produced by ISRIC - World Soil Information in a collaborative effort with the National Soil Survey, Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism, Tanzania Forest Services, Sokoine University, and AfSIS.

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    Capacity of the fine earth fraction* to hold exchangeable cations, estimated by buffering the soil at 'pH8' (cmol(c)/kg). ISRIC is developing a centralized and user–focused server database, known as ISRIC World Soil Information Service (WoSIS). The aims are to: • Safeguard world soil data "as is" • Share soil data (point, polygon, grid) upon their standardization and harmonization • Provide quality-assessed input for a growing range of environmental applications. So far some 400,000 profiles have been imported into WoSIS from disparate soil databases; some 150,000 of have been standardised. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Further, in most source data sets, there are fewer data for soil physical as opposed to soil chemical attributes and there are fewer measurements for deeper than for superficial horizons. Generally, limited quality information is associated with the various source data. Special attention has been paid to the standardization of soil analytical method descriptions with focus on the set of soil properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications. Newly developed procedures for the above, that consider the soil property, analytical method and unit of measurement, have been applied to the present set of geo-referenced soil profile data. Gradually, the quality assessed and harmonized "shared" data will be made available to the international community through several webservices. All data managed in WoSIS are handled in conformance with ISRICs data use and citation policy, respecting inherited restrictions. The most recent set of standardized attributes derived from WoSIS are available via WFS. For instructions see Procedures manual 2018, Appendix A, link below (Procedures manual 2018). * The fine earth fraction is generally defined as being less than 2 mm. However, an upper limit of 1 mm was used in the former Soviet Union and its sattelite states (Katchynsky scheme). This has been indicated in the database.

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    Soil moisture content by weight, at tension 200 kPa (pF 3.3) (g/100g). ISRIC is developing a centralized and user–focused server database, known as ISRIC World Soil Information Service (WoSIS). The aims are to: • Safeguard world soil data "as is" • Share soil data (point, polygon, grid) upon their standardization and harmonization • Provide quality-assessed input for a growing range of environmental applications. So far some 400,000 profiles have been imported into WoSIS from disparate soil databases; some 150,000 of have been standardised. The number of measured data for each property varies between profiles and with depth, generally depending on the purpose of the initial studies. Further, in most source data sets, there are fewer data for soil physical as opposed to soil chemical attributes and there are fewer measurements for deeper than for superficial horizons. Generally, limited quality information is associated with the various source data. Special attention has been paid to the standardization of soil analytical method descriptions with focus on the set of soil properties considered in the GlobalSoilMap specifications. Newly developed procedures for the above, that consider the soil property, analytical method and unit of measurement, have been applied to the present set of geo-referenced soil profile data. Gradually, the quality assessed and harmonized "shared" data will be made available to the international community through several webservices. All data managed in WoSIS are handled in conformance with ISRICs data use and citation policy, respecting inherited restrictions. The most recent set of standardized attributes derived from WoSIS are available via WFS. For instructions see Procedures manual 2018, Appendix A, link below (Procedures manual 2018)

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    The Soil and Terrain database for Argentina primary data (version 1.0), at scale 1:1 million (SOTER_Argentina), was compiled of enhanced soil information within the framework of the FAO's program Land Degradation Assessment in Drylands (LADA). Primary soil and terrain data for Argentina were obtained from the SOTERLAC database (ver. 2) at scale 1:5 million. This update includes considerable changes in the GIS file, based on the SRTM-DEM derived surface information and on INTA's digital soil map (Instituto de Suelos), and only few changes of the attributes database. SOTER forms a part of the ongoing activities of ISRIC, FAO and UNEP to update the world's baseline information on natural resources.The project involved collaboration with national soil institutes from the countries in the region as well as individual experts.

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    Volumetric coarse fragments content (v%) of the soil whole earth, aggregated over rootable depth and the top 30 cm, mapped at 1km resolution

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    Extractable Iron (Fe) content of the soil fine earth fraction in mg/kg (ppm) as measured according to the soil analytical procedure of Mehlich 3 and spatially predicted for 0-30 cm depth interval at 250 m spatial resolution across sub-Saharan Africa using Machine Learning (ensemble between random forest and gradient boosting) using soil data from the Africa Soil Profiles database (AfSP) compiled by AfSIS and recent soil data newly collected by AfSIS in partnership with EthioSIS (Ethiopia), GhaSIS (Ghana) and NiSIS (Nigeria as made possible by OCP Africa and IITA), combined with soil data as made available by Wageningen University and Research, IFDC, VitalSigns, University of California and the OneAcreFund. [Values M = mean value predicted]. For details see below for peer reviewed paper (T. Hengl, J.G.B. Leenaars, K.D. Shepherd, M.G. Walsh, G.B.M. Heuvelink, Tekalign Mamo, H. Tilahun, E. Berkhout, M. Cooper, E. Fegraus, I. Wheeler, N.A. Kwabena, 2017. Soil nutrient maps of Sub-Saharan Africa: assessment of soil nutrient content at 250 m spatial resolution using machine learning. Nutriënt Cycling in Agroecosystems 109(1): 77-102). Maps produced for the Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL), funded by the Netherlands government, in collaboration with the AfSIS and the Vital Signs projects.